At its core, Freemasonry revolves around a number of timeless principles such as truth, honour, decency, kindness and support. Over the last few hundred years the staples of everyday life such as culture, technology, welfare and education have changed enormously, but the timeless principles on which Freemasonry is founded have not, while their importance for leading a well-rounded life has only increased.

 

These principles are the basis for all Freemasonry's teachings and together form a moral code which Freemasons themselves strive to live by. In a world where material wealth and appearance are priorities, Freemasons understand that true wealth has little to do with the car you drive or the clothes you wear, rather it is derived by living a good and positive life, helping others and continuous self-improvement. 

 

Freemasonry is also known as 'The Craft' which comes from its beginning in stonemasons' lodges where members honed their stone craft, smoothing rough bricks and using them to build enormous structures which became greater than the sum of their parts. Freemasons figuratively hone their craft by chipping away at their own character, developing themselves as better human beings one block at a time, principle upon principle. As Freemasons better themselves internally, they improve their relationships with friends and family, the quality of their work and in a larger sense help improve society as a whole.

 

The lessons of Freemasonry are taught through ancient ritual which has changed little over the centuries, after all the timeless principles behind the lessons haven't changed a bit. The ritual is open to individual interpretation so that whilst the broad meaning is fixed, each individual Freemason will understand and take away meanings unique to their own needs. In this way the same piece of ritual will always be relevant and can provide new meaning depending on circumstance. This lack of universal dogma makes Freemasonry unique and ensures its ongoing adaptability to changes in society, culture and needs of its members.

 

For further information on Freemasonry as a whole, the Wikipedia page is well written and sourced. The other pages here are local to South Australian and Northern Territorian Freemasonry.

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